SBC Magazine May 2017 : Page 7

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE Board of Directors Executive Committee President: Jack Dermer American Truss Systems, Inc. • Houston, TX President-Elect/Treasurer: Jim Finkenhoefer Truss Systems • Oxford, GA Secretary: Greg Griggs Builders FirstSource • Kennesaw, GA Past President: Jess Lohse Rocky Mountain Truss Co. • Havre, MT Joe Hikel Shelter Systems Limited • Westminster, MD Mike Ruede A-1 Roof Trusses • Fort Pierce, FL Steve Stroder California TrusFrame • Perris, CA Scott Ward Southern Components, Inc. • Shreveport, LA Spring: A Chance to Sow Seeds for Future Harvest WITH A NEW ADMINISTRATION in the White House, and Republicans in control of both chambers of Congress, there appears to be a more business-friendly environment in Washington, DC than there has been in quite a while. SBCA has taken the last few years off from visiting Capitol Hill, but now is a good time to reconnect with the people who are setting policy for the immediate and near future. It’s a perfect opportunity to reintroduce our industry to those inside the beltway and make sure the issues that matter to us are on our representatives’ minds. Trade—specifically, the softwood lumber agreement—is one of the biggest issues our industry faces. Our two major raw materials, wood and steel, are commodities that are significantly affected by how our country treats imports from other countries. Whether it’s lumber from Canada or steel from China, our industry relies on for-eign sources of raw material to pro-vide reasonably cost-stable supplies. It’s important for industries like ours to explain how an “America First” approach to trade doesn’t necessarily put a majority of American compa-nies, especially those that serve local US markets, first. Immigration is clearly one of the most contentious issues affecting our industry. As lawmakers discuss legislation that could change the workforce of this country, we need to share how various options would impact our businesses and the operations of our customers. There are no quick or easy solutions, but providing our perspective now and continuing to make our voices heard is critical to realizing an outcome that works for the building, housing and component manufacturing sectors. At-Large Directors Barry Dixon True House, Inc. dba True Truss • Jacksonville, FL Gene Frogale Allied Systems • Winchester, VA Eric James Hart Components • San Antonio, TX Jeff Smith Trussway Manufacturing, Inc. • Houston, TX Directors Representing Chapters Dallas Austin Big C Lumber Truss & Panel • Dowagiac, MI Keith Azlin U.S. Components, LLC • Tucson, AZ Dave Green Carolina Structural Systems • Ether, NC Josh Hendrickson Contractor’s Building Systems • Madison, AL Taft Ketchum PDJ Components, Inc. • Chester, NY Kelly LaBlance Builders FirstSource • Plant City, FL David Motter, P.E. Louws Truss, Inc., • Ferndale, WA Rick Parrino Plum Building Systems, LLC • Waukee, IA Justin Richardson Richco Structures • Sheboygan, WI Steve Strom The Truss Company & Building Supply • Eugene, OR Jeff Taake Mead Lumber Co. • Columbus, NE Javan Yoder Stark Truss Company, Inc. • Canton, OH It is important for our industry to have a voice and to shine a light on the issues we face. Going to DC lets us take part in shaping the future. Associate Member Directors John Branstetter Vaagen Brothers Lumber, Inc. • Colville, WA Steve Cabler MiTek USA, Inc. • Chesterfield, MO Ken Shifflett Ace Carpentry, Inc. • Manassas, VA Steve Shrader Hundegger USA, L.C. • Heber City, UT As I think about all the times I’ve met with my lawmakers in DC over the years, I realize how important it is for our industry to have a voice, and to help shine a light on the issues we face with materials, labor and infrastructure. It is also critical to listen to what is being proposed for our future and learn all we can about the hurdles we will face as we expand our businesses and our industry. We need to know how our representatives look at the home building and manufacturing industries, how they plan to help spur economic growth, and how we can be ready to act on policies and regulations that are in the works. In many ways, going to DC lets us take part in shaping the future. It’s an opportunity to put a face on the structural building components industry as we explain to policy mak-ers how we supply the home building industry and provide our communities with real MAY 2017 • sbcmag.info 7

President’s Message



Spring: A Chance to Sow Seeds for Future Harvest
WITH A NEW ADMINISTRATION in the White House, and Republicans in control of both chambers of Congress, there appears to be a more business-friendly environment in Washington, DC than there has been in quite a while. SBCA has taken the last few years off from visiting Capitol Hill, but now is a good time to reconnect with the people who are setting policy for the immediate and near future. It’s a perfect opportunity to reintroduce our industry to those inside the beltway and make sure the issues that matter to us are on our representatives’ minds.

Trade—specifically, the softwood lumber agreement—is one of the biggest issues our industry faces. Our two major raw materials, wood and steel, are commodities that are significantly affected by how our country treats imports from other countries. Whether it’s lumber from Canada or steel from China, our industry relies on foreign sources of raw material to provide reasonably cost-stable supplies. It’s important for industries like ours to explain how an “America First” approach to trade doesn’t necessarily put a majority of American companies, especially those that serve local US markets, first.


It is important for our industry to have a voice and to shine a light on the issues we face. Going to DC lets us take part in shaping the future.


Immigration is clearly one of the most contentious issues affecting our industry. As lawmakers discuss legislation that could change the workforce of this country, we need to share how various options would impact our businesses and the operations of our customers. There are no quick or easy solutions, but providing our perspective now and continuing to make our voices heard is critical to realizing an outcome that works for the building, housing and component manufacturing sectors.

As I think about all the times I’ve met with my lawmakers in DC over the years, I realize how important it is for our industry to have a voice, and to help shine a light on the issues we face with materials, labor and infrastructure. It is also critical to listen to what is being proposed for our future and learn all we can about the hurdles we will face as we expand our businesses and our industry. We need to know how our representatives look at the home building and manufacturing industries, how they plan to help spur economic growth, and how we can be ready to act on policies and regulations that are in the works.

In many ways, going to DC lets us take part in shaping the future. It’s an opportunity to put a face on the structural building components industry as we explain to policy makers how we supply the home building industry and provide our communities with real opportunities for job growth and long careers in manufacturing. It never hurts to invite legislators to tour our plants for a first-hand look at our operations. It’s always important to remind the people making policies that we vote.

I invite every SBCA member to join me at the next SBCA Open Quarterly Meeting (OQM) in Baltimore, and I encourage you to come a day early and join us as we visit our lawmakers in DC. If you haven’t thought about it before, consider it now. If you’ve been meaning to make the trip or get more involved, now is the time! The weather should be good, and a quick trip to the nation’s capital will no doubt be both fun and interesting.



Jack Dermer

SBCA President

jdermer@atruss.com

Read the full article at http://digital.sbcmag.info/article/President%E2%80%99s+Message/2773559/403967/article.html.

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